Friday, 13 January 2012

Danish Windmills


 
In Denmark wind power was an important part of a decentralized electrification in the first quarter of the 20th century, partly because of Poul la Cour from his first practical development in 1891 at Askov.
A giant change took place in 1978 when the world's first multi-megawatt wind turbine was constructed. It pioneered many technologies used in modern wind turbines and allowed Vestas, Siemens and others to get the parts they needed. Especially important was the novel wing construction using help from German aeronautics specialists.
 
Danish commercial wind power development stressed incremental improvements in capacity and efficiency based on extensive serial production of turbines, in contrast with development models requiring extensive steps in unit size based primarily on theoretical extrapolation. A practical consequence is that all commercial wind turbines resemble the Danish model, a light-weight three-blade upwind design.
On 10  January 2007, Denmark Post issued the stamp to commemorate the development of Danish Windmill in 4 postage stamps. Askov Windmill, Gedser Windmill, Middelgrunden.


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Askov 1891
In the 1890s a Danish scientist, Poul la Cour, constructed wind turbines to generate electricity, which was then used to produce hydrogen for experiments and light and the Askov Highschool. His last windmill of 1896 later became the local powerplant of the village of Askov.
In Denmark wind power was an important part of a decentralized electrification in the first quarter of the 20th century, partly because of Poul la Cour from his first practical development in 1891 at Askov.

 
 
 
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Gedser 1957

In 1957 Johannes Juul installed a 24 m diameter wind turbine at Gedser, which ran from 1957 until 1967. This was a three-bladed, horizontal-axis, upwind, stall-regulated turbine similar to those now used for commercial wind power development. (Photo image taken from Danish Wind Industry Association)
The Gedser wind turbine was a major technological breakthrough for the modern wind turbine. The design and concept of the wind turbine with an asynchronous generator, 3 stall-regulated blades and break-tips at the end of each blade is still widely used in modern Danish wind turbines.


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Bogø 1989
As the 21st century began, fossil fuel was still relatively cheap, but rising concerns over energy security, global warming, and eventual fossil fuel depletion led to an expansion of interest in all available forms of renewable energy. The fledgling commercial wind power industry began expanding at a robust growth rate of about 30% per year, driven by the ready availability of large wind resources, and falling costs due to improved technology and wind farm management.






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Middelgrunden 2000- (Photo taken from Wikipedia)


Middelgrunden is an offshore wind farm in the Øresund 3.5 km outside Copenhagen, Denmark. When it was built in 2000, it was the world's largest offshore farm, with 20 turbines and a capacity of 40 MW. The farm delivers about 4% of the power for Copenhagen.
This project is an example for community wind energy. It is 50% owned by the 10,000 investors in the Middelgrunden Wind Turbine Cooperative, and 50% by the municipal utility company. Being clearly visible from the capital of Denmark it states the importance of wind power in Denmark.
(Resources from Wikipedia, Windmill Community)

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